Purple Teeth Cellars - FAQ

General

What is the difference between Petite Sirah and Syrah (or Shiraz)?
How much wine do you make?
When can I drink my wine?
How do I store my wine?
Is it true that you are donating a portion of your profits to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF)? Why?

Obtaining Some Wine

What if I get a tainted bottle?
Is your wine available in restaurants and retail wine stores?
What do you do with my contact information?

Fun

Why do teeth turn purple?
How do you remove the purple teeth stain?

General

What is the difference between Petite Sirah and Syrah (or Shiraz)?

Syrah (Shiraz)

Syrah is better known and the primary grape in the Rhone Valley of France. It is rarely blended with anything in the great reds of Northern Rhone while it is often part of fantastic blends in the Southern Rhone where it contributes much of the character and aging potential. It is known as Shiraz in Australia and is the most widely planted varietal there. Syrah is typically resistant to mildew and rot and is capable of aging majestically. At its best, Syrah can slug it out with high end Cabernet and Pinot Noir. It responds well to oak maturation and often exhibits a peppery aroma or flavor.

Petite Sirah (Durif)

The Petite Sirah grape shares half of its DNA with Syrah. It was developed by Dr. Francois Durif in France around 1880 with parents of Syrah and Peloursin. For comparison using a grape more familiar to most people, Cabernet Sauvignon has parents of Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon Blanc. Petite Sirah is grown mainly in California and Australia now. It makes dark, well-balanced wines with sturdy tannins and distinctive flavors. It is often used in red blends to shore up a pale or soft harvest of another grape. It will reward those with patience to cellar but if you cannot wait it will benefit from decanting.

How much wine do you make?

We are starting small so our 2006 vintage of Eaglepoint Ranch Petite Sirah will have 25 cases, which amounts to 300 bottles total. In 2007, we branched out and made 2 different Syrahs. One is our Alder Springs Syrah and the other is our White Hawk Syrah. We will have 25 cases of each syrah. For the 2008 vintage, we have doubled this and will have 50 cases of each Syrah.

When can I drink my wine?

You can drink it this year or lay it down for a few years. You should definitely let the bottle(s) rest for a few days after receipt. We will keep you posted on this site regarding when we think the wine will be at its best. Exact timing for opening a bottle does depend on what characteristics you like in your wine as well as if you are having it with or without food. As always, you can ask us!

How do I store my wine?

For longer term, you really need to make arrangements for a dark, humid, cool, environment which is free from vibration. It is best to allow wine to set quietly for a few days or weeks after arrival at a temperature of less than 60 degrees Fahrenheit, preferably around 55 degrees, and absolutely less than 70 degrees. The most important thing is that your wine storage area remains at a consistent temperature.

Is it true that you are donating a portion of your profits to the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF)? Why?

Yep, it's true. We have some close family members and friends who have been directly impacted by Type 1 diabetes. When we created Purple Teeth Cellars, it was important to us to "give back" and this is one way for us to achieve that goal. You can learn more about JDRF here.

Obtaining Some Wine

What if I get a tainted bottle?

Please notify us immediately and let us know what happened. We want our customers to be happy and satisfied customers, whether things go right or wrong. Because we make so little wine, an exact replacement may not be available, but we will make things right.

Is your wine available in restaurants and retail wine stores?

Our focus is on producing premium wines in very small lots, so this precludes us from having our wines available in restaurants and retail wine stores at this time. When we grow a little, it may become available in these places and we will try to list them here.

What do you do with my contact information?

Absolutely nothing. We do not like it when people share our data without our permission, so we will not do it to you. We use your information only for our business with you.

Fun

Why do teeth turn purple?

Your teeth (and lips) aren’t really purple. What you see is a thin layer of wine darkened saliva and/or plaque which brushing will remove. Bear in mind that you shouldn’t brush too soon after drinking wine due to the acids in the wine damaging the enamel on your teeth if you brush immediately. See below for other methods.

How do you remove the purple teeth stain?

There are different ways to remove the stain. Our personal favorite is rinsing with a white wine because then you can continue enjoying the red wine. You can also rinse with water, but you’ll note that the best method for removing a red wine stain from a carpet is using white wine so why not for your teeth? Another good method is eating some cheese making sure you thoroughly enjoy it in your mouth. The bonus for this method is that many cheeses pair wonderfully with red wine. You can also brush your teeth but this generally puts an end to further consumption as toothpaste and wine aren’t a great food pairing. In addition, we recommend regular visits to the dentist to ward off any long term staining. Much like coffee, tea, and other beverages, these stains can be polished up with regular visits.

Do you have other questions?

Ask Us!